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Jairus' Daughter

Shepherd Birth

When Jesus returned, the multitude welcomed him, for they were all waiting for him.

There were shepherds in the same country staying in the field, and keeping watch by night over their flock.

Behold, a man named Jairus came. He was a ruler of the synagogue.

Behold, an angel of the Lord stood by them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified.

He fell down at Jesus’ feet, and begged him to come into his house, for he had an only daughter, about twelve years of age, and she was dying.

The angel said to them, “Don’t be afraid, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy which will be to all the people.

But as he went, the multitudes pressed against him.

For there is born to you today, in David’s city, a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.

A woman who had a flow of blood for twelve years, who had spent all her living on physicians and could not be healed by any came behind him, and touched the fringe of his cloak.

This is the sign to you: you will find a baby wrapped in strips of cloth, lying in a feeding trough.”

Immediately the flow of her blood stopped. Jesus said, “Who touched me?” When all denied it, Peter (pe’-tur)
A stone; a rock.

Source: EDBN
and those with him said, “Master, the multitudes press and jostle you, and you say, ‘Who touched me?’” But Jesus said, “Someone did touch me, for I perceived that power has gone out of me.”

Suddenly, there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly army praising God, and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, on earth peace, good will toward men.”

When the woman saw that she was not hidden, she came trembling, and falling down before him declared to him in the presence of all the people the reason why she had touched him, and how she was healed immediately.

When the angels went away from them into the sky, the shepherds said to one another, “Let’s go to Bethlehem, now, and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.”

Jairus’ Daughter (compared)

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Jairus’ Daughter (compared)

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The Story of Jairus and the Christmas Angel

Shepherd BirthJairus' DaughterComparing any given passage to a Revelation is the most powerful thing you can do on Zerah.com. That’s just what we did, comparing the story of Jairus to the City of Light in Revelation.

You can compare anything. For example, one thread I often compare is the Shepherd story in the Birth of Christ. Let’s take a look.

The Shepherd Story

The story begins with multitudes waiting for Jesus and shepherds keeping watch over their flock. We are the multitudes. We are the flock.

Then, a man named Jairus comes looking for Jesus. His name means “to diffuse light.” An angel stands before the shepherds. The angel is shining.

Jairus’ daughter is dying. In desperation, Jairus falls at Jesus’ feet. On the right, the angel brings good news for all the people, who otherwise are dying.

After this, Jesus “went”. He goes or goes out. A savior is born in David’s city. As I mentioned in the City of Light story, this is the main entrance. Jesus was born into our world so we can enter his.

The woman touches Jesus’ cloak. The baby is wrapped in strips of cloth, lying in a feeding trough. The cloak and the cloth symbolize the same thing — a soul covered or a soul restored.

Immediately the woman is healed. Suddenly, a great multitude of angels appear, praising God. What does the Jairus story talk about? Multitudes.

The shepherds then say, “let us go to Bethlehem and see this thing that’s been revealed.” The woman whom Jesus healed realizes something. She is not hidden. She has been revealed.

Parallels like this bring scripture to life. With them, you can clearly see there’s more going on than the individual story. There’s something deeper happening in the words and behind the words. To me, it’s like seeing the fingerprints of God, because the words work together so clearly and so intricately.

There’s one more thing I’d like to do: finish the Jairus story. So far, we’ve only looked at the first half. Now let’s look at the rest. Click the “(parallel)” link below, or the right arrow, to take a look:

To explore these passages directly, click this button: